Running Hiatus.

These past three weeks I haven’t been running. It was mainly because I didn’t have time and I needed a break. It’s because I thought since I will start some intense training in June, I might as well take a breather. Needless to say these few weeks I have felt deprived of what I love to do. Even though I chose for things to be this way, it raised the concern of when should a runner take some time off. I know there are people out there that do some hardcore training year round and manage to go injury free. Image

I have yet to suffer from some serious injury but that’s probably because I have some down time for my body to recover. However I would love to be the type that runs year round and enjoys every season. For now, I will countdown the days until I start up my running again. I can’t really have blog post when I’m not running because that is when I am the least creative.

 

Therefore, I want to pose the question: Are you a year round runner? When would it be the right time to take a break from the sport?

Is running purely painful or pleasure?

Over the years I have encountered a good amount of people who ask, “How is running fun?” or “Are you not suffering when you run?”. I can’t help but to think of a good response. A majority of the time I will answer it is painful, it’s not always easy. That answer always strikes a conversation. Who enjoys pain? What could you possibly get out of a dreadful activity? Why not just do some P90x or insanity to get in shape? As a reply to these questions, I care more to see what you other runners would say. I am well aware that running won’t always be seen like this:

Original-Ridiculously-Photogenic-Guy

I can assure you this picture was not taken 20 miles into the marathon. Even if it was I would not be surprised, the man might have some Taraumara in him. In short, I can say I run most of the time with the goal of punishing myself. How I handle the punishment will determine what type of runner/person I am. Running a 1,600 feet climb over the course of a mile never sounds pain free. However the reward comes at the end of the run. I can either assure myself that my mental and physical strength  were strong enough to help me get through my run or I can man up and face the fact I was too much of weakling to conquer my run. If you are thinking I am being too hard on myself, I’m not. Every human has limits, we however are not able to reach those limits. Just when you think you have nothing, there is always something deep down that will push you to great measure. I said it, your question has been answered. Every runner has their own take on it. Each opinion lets you see why a runner runs and what motivates them to do this on a regular basis.

Therefore I am interested in hearing from you, runner or not. Is running a painful or pleasure-filled experience for you? If you don’t run, how do you perceive those of us who do?

The politics of running!

If there is one great thing about running that we can all agree on, it’s that there are absolutely no politics involved. Running is an activity where conservatives and liberals can share the pains and joys of the sport. We can look beyond our differences and focus on our true passion. There’s no need to look for middle grounds or bipartisan agreements.

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The picture above is from the 2012 women’s 5000 meter race. There are about seven countries running in the race, that’s seven different cultures. These countries were able to put aside the hatred that may have existed to chase after one goal, gold. Everyone is understanding of the determination and struggle it takes to get to the Olympic level. If everyone from the picture has one thing in common, it’s that they all sacrificed money, time and effort to get to where they are. Similarly, runners of all levels are nothing short of appreciative of the unity that running may bring. You would often hear stories of how a runner was able to help out his/her opponent during a big race. Unlike any other sports, running produces  people who are kindhearted , openminded and supportive.

people-running

 

There’s something about running that brings a group of people close together. When you think of yourself in a room with random people you don’t know, you often find that it is more challenging to socialize than being in a room with people who share the same interests as you. If you’ve ever ran in a race you know what I mean. It doesn’t take a whole lot for a runner to reach out and start talking to another runner. As runners we have this deep interest for networking and gaining more insight. This is why we buy books, attend seminars, go on group runs and write blogs. As a result of our desire to make more friends and learn more about the sport, we find ourselves unintentionally fueling our passion for what we have grown to love and adore deeply.